Meet-Ups

We meet-up here in the blogosphere in an exchange of wonder. It still amazes me when I Skype with a friend in Ukraine, or realize that the BungalowBlogger is online in Italy the same time as I in California. Computers, to me, are still such a miracle that I invent cartoony explanations in my mind for how they work at all. Face-to-face meetings, though, I understand and value above all the others. When blogging companions meet-up, there’s a unique thrill. It’s as if we all walk out of a science fiction world and prove we are also real.

meeting-up
meeting-up

Once upon a time at the bungalow, we brought together three blogging buddies, handshakes instead of posted comments. While we all have interesting lives with lots happening, the moment that me, Marsha met-up with Barney and The Hermit has a very special meaning.

 

great place for a meet-up
great place for a meet-up

Thanks to Beth and Joe, it has happened again. In the tiny town of Los Osos, five traveling souls met-up, and what a time we had! If you think these people entertain by writing through their blogs – and all three, Barney, the Hermit, and Beth and Joe certainly do – you should hear their voices in story. I will treasure my second meet-up, and hope for many more in the future.

Love-Love-Love (sung to the tune of the Beatles’ song, of course)

 

 

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Why I ‘like’ You

Say you’re reading a nicely written and very sad blog post. How do you feel when it comes time to push the ‘like’ button? How can you like a sad story? It feels as if you are being happy at someone else’s misfortune – or worse, laughing at their pain. On the other hand, say you have just read a poorly written blog post that you didn’t enjoy at all. But you spent some time on that blogger’s patch of cyberspace. Maybe you didn’t like or even appreciate what was written, but how do you say ‘thanks for inviting me over, for allowing me in’?

short fences, open gates
short fences, open gates

It’s as if you are looking over your neighbor’s fence. Around my neighborhood, where fences are very short, it’s an easy solution. You see someone, you wave, greet, acknowledge each other. You have to: you are face-to-face. But online, you have a chance to be a bit of a peeping blogger. No one will know you have spent time in someone else’s cyber yard. You can look around, make your assessments and still leave anonymous.

That’s why I have decided that ‘liking’ every post I read is my way of saying “thanks for opening your cyber neighborhood to me.” It tells the fellow blogger that I stopped in, helped myself to their goodies, and appreciate their effort.

Otherwise, I feel a bit of a sneak. And we just can’t have that.